I Was Reminded Of 25 Albums I Left Off My Previous Lists

As usual, my family and friends have stepped up to remind me of some essential albums I left off my previous two lists. It’s like everyone’s an expert now. You know the new adage, give a guy a blog, and he thinks he rules the world. As the Stones have said, “It’s only rock ‘n’ roll, but I like it, like it, yes i do.” Here we go again, in chronological order.

  1. James Brown – Live at the Apollo (1963). This is a document of why Brown was called “The World’s Hardest Working Man” and “Soul Brother #1”. Here is the beginning of funk.
  2. The Beach Boys – Pet Sounds (1966). This is what happens when a musical genius outgrows his band’s musical talents but not their singing talents. This is the act of pop music growing up.
  3. The Beatles – Revolver (1966). This is my favorite Beatles album, and the one that influenced my favorite genre of musical – power pop.
  4. Bob Dylan – Blonde on Blonde (1966). Oh the growth Bob displayed between his previous album (Highway 61 Revisited) and this one is extraordinary. Bob really DID change the world.
  5. The Zombies – Odessey and the Oracle (1968). This album takes Pet Sounds and combines it with Sgt. Pepper to create this baroque rock masterpiece.
  6. The Band – The Band (1969). The Band may have been the greatest rock band in the world when they recorded this gem of Americana music. The irony is it was created by an Arkansasan and four Canadians.
  7. Deep Purple – Machine Head (1972). Along with Sabbath and Zeppelin, Deep Purple helped birth heavy metal, along with the greatest guitar riff of all time, “Smoke on the Water”.
  8. Bob Dylan and the Band – The Basement Tapes (1975). The long-rumored and oft-bootlegged collaboration between Dylan and a fully constituted Band was a beautiful collection fun rock ‘n’ roll.
  9. Earth, Wind & Fire – That’s the Way of the World (1975). This album is the intersection of funk, soul and spirituality. Plus, it’s got a good beat and easy to dance to.
  10. Parliament – Mothership Connection (1975). We need the funk! Gotta have the funk! What else can I say?
  11. KISS – Destroyer (1976). And here’s the gateway drug of millions of kids into the metal scene. And what better way than using four masked men to do the trick.
  12. Lynyrd Skynyrd – One More from the Road (1976). This live album allowed the boys in Skynyrd to fully show their musical chops. In other words, these rednecks could jam! Plus, the album contains the definitive version of “Free Bird”, with all the yelling too.
  13. Stevie Wonder – Songs in the Key of Life (1976). If you really want to know where D’Angelo and Kendrick Lamar got their Black Power message, look to this classic. Wonder takes us on a musical history trip through the music of African Americans.
  14. Elvis Costello – My Aim Is True (1977). The greatest songwriter of rock’s third generation showed his fully developed skills on his debut. Plus, it has one of my favorite lines of all-time: “I used to be disgusted, now I try to be amused.”
  15. Steely Dan – Aja (1977). This album is where jazz, rock and pop music met comfortably only because Becker and Fagen’s songwriting and vision.
  16. The Cars – The Cars (1978). As I have said before, this is the intersection of new wave and album oriented rock. Plus, their songwriting was strong.
  17. Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers – Damn the Torpedoes (1979). Created at a time when Petty and company had nothing left to lose except to push the boundaries of rock music beyond anything else.
  18. Cheap Trick – Heaven Tonight (1978). Here’s where Cheap Trick transcended power pop music and became rock stars, and eventually Hall of Famers.
  19. Def Leppard – Pyromania (1982). Who knew metal could be played within pop constraints? Sure, hair metal was the outcome. But, at least the band was gifted to us.
  20. Bob Marley – Legend (1984). Few Americans really knew the power of Bob Marley’s gift until after his death when this album was released.
  21. Eric B. & Rakim – Paid in Full (1987). Rap turned a corner after this album was released. Eminem would have never been possible if it weren’t for Rakim, possibly the greatest MC of all-time.
  22. Prince – Sign ‘o’ the Times (1987). This album was Prince’s third or fourth masterpiece, but this is the one that has the most lasting effect on music, from P.M. Dawn’s hippie hip hop through D’Angelo’s and Kendrick Lamar’s recent masterpieces.
  23. Pixies – Doolittle (1989). Here’s where Black Francis and company perfected the Loud-soft-loud song structure that Cobain would perfect in a couple of years in Nirvana.
  24. Pearl Jam – Ten (1991). These rock gods of the Nineties have outlasted everyone else from the grunge era through sure will and love. But, it is their first album which has stuck in our collective hearts the longest.
  25. Eminem – The Marshall Mathers LP (2000). Boy, did I ever catch hell over leaving this one off my original lists. This was a bonding album between my boys and me. Slim Shady may be the greatest rock alter-ego ever.

So, there’s my updated list. But, guess what? That’s right! There’s one more to come tomorrow that should set the record straight, once and for all!

Author: ifmyalbumscouldtalk

I am just a long-time music fan who used to be a high school science teacher and a varsity coach of several high school athletic teams. Before that, I worked as a medical technologist at three hospitals in their labs, mainly as a microbiologist. I am retired/disabled (Failed Back Surgery Syndrome), and this is my attempt to remain a human. Additionally, I am a serious vinyl aficionado, with a CD addiction and a love of reading about rock history. Finally, I am a fan of Prince, Cheap Trick, Tom Petty, R.E.M., Hall & Oates, Springsteen, Paul Weller & his bands and Power Pop music.

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